Archive for November, 2011

Craig Grannell murders the HP Envy’s design video:-

You’ll notice with the product that we integrated a volume wheel that has what I call interaction gravity […] That is what pulls people into the product to interact with it.

Unlike, say, the keyboard and the screen. Or perhaps they have ‘interaction gravity’ too. Man, my pen, which I just used to scribble a note, also has interaction gravity! As does the notepad! And my desk! And my chair! INTERACTION GRAVITY IS EVERYWHERE!

I also nearly choked on my drink at “I have engaged you, notebook! Show me your next level of design!”.

iMessage doesn’t auto-detect other party’s iMessage capability

November 24, 2011  |  Tags: ,   |  

When using the Messages app on iOS 5 with iMessage enabled, you should be able to choose a name from your address book, and have it automatically convert from sending a text message (green) to an iMessage (blue) when the other party supports it:

IMG 1559

For some reason, though, this iMessage auto-detect feature wasn’t working reliably for me — among the people who I knew for sure were on iOS 5, when I started composing a message, some turned blue* and some didn’t. I did some testing with my screenshotted friend Steven:-

  • I realised my iMessage caller ID (Settings → Messages → Receive At → Caller ID) was set to my email address. When I changed it back to my phone number, auto-detect worked just fine. When I changed it back to my email, it went reliably flakey again.
  • When Steven did the same, though, his phone could auto-detect for anyone, regardless of caller ID.

Turns out that Steven, who is insane, had added country codes in front of all his address book numbers. (WTF?!) So I tried adding a country code in front of a friend’s number, and violins*, my iMessage app could auto-detect even with my caller ID set to an email address!

I suppose this sort of makes sense: without a country code, the iMessage lookup server might not know where your recipient’s phone number is from, and doesn’t have your own phone number’s country code to fall back on as a source of information.

Anyway, possible fixes:-

  • If you’re insane like Steven, add a country code in front of every single one of your contacts.
  • If you’re lazy like me, switch to using your phone number as your iMessage caller ID.

* Nobody turned blue. Don’t call the cops. ** What? Violins are pretty surprising to me.

Marc Edwards writes great design articles on the Bjango blog. This one has a giant table and a histogram, so I like it even more than usual. The Iterate podcast he does with a couple of other folks is great listening, too.

Could be handy for anyone needing a glyph for the DF linked list plugin.

Great:

Importing a blog or RSS feed to your personal Facebook account is no longer available. If you want to share your blog posts on Facebook, you can:

…give up on sharing on Facebook? Thanks a lot.

  OpenClassroom →  November 9

Stanford OpenClassroom:

Full courses. Short Videos. Free for everyone.

Introductory courses to human-computer interaction, building web applications, algorithms, databases, and machine learning. Also, Algebra One (“This is a course created to test the website. Do not watch.”).

An interview with Dale Dougherty, co-founder of O’Reilly Media and MAKE magazine. Tim O’Reilly sums it up:

“When you see kids at Maker Faire suddenly turned on to science and math because they want to make things, when you see them dragging their parents around with eyes shining, you realize just how dull our education system has made some of the most exciting and interesting stuff in the world.

Dougherty explains in detail the promise of the maker movement in education (and government). Pretty inspiring.